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Should You Start Waxing In Your Early Teens?

Should You Start Waxing In Your Early Teens?

Among teen and preteen girls, hair removal can be a sensitive and tricky subject to tackle, emotionally and physically. A typical question among readers with daughters is that what is the right age to ger your first wax?

Is there a right age?

Many circle of moms members share that their daughters began requesting to shave between the ages of 9 and 13, and most moms feel that this age range is a completely appropriate time for a girl to start shaving.

Most of the time the decision for a child to be waxed or not will come down to the mother — and some mothers want their children to start waxing early. Perhaps they have their own insecurities from when they were a child or perhaps they feel pressure to keep up with what the other mothers are doing.

The general notion is that girls may start to be interested in hair removal once they hit puberty and hair growth spikes, but that is not always the case. Children are physically developing a lot earlier than years gone by due to what we are eating and using in our day to day lives.

Here are some tips before getting your teen’s first wax:

Before removing hair, it helps to know about the different types of hair on our bodies. All hair is made of keratin, a hard protein that’s also found in your fingernails and toenails. Hair growth begins beneath the surface of your skin at a hair root inside a hair follicle, a small tube in the skin.

Before removing hair, it helps to know about the different types of hair on our bodies. All hair is made of keratin, a hard protein that’s also found in your fingernails and toenails. Hair growth begins beneath the surface of your skin at a hair root inside a hair follicle, a small tube in the skin.

You have two types of hair on your body.

Vellus hair is soft, fine, and short. Most women have vellus hair on their chest, back, and face. It can be darker and more noticeable in some women than others, especially those with darker complexions. Vellus hair helps the body maintain a steady temperature by providing some insulation.

Once waxing is determined to be a safe method of hair removal, it’s important to inform your wax-performing esthetician about your allergies and skin sensitivities prior to your service. This can help your esthetician choose the appropriate kind of wax for your skin type, and make the process a lot easier on your skin.

Probably the most unavoidable part of waxing is the dreaded pain factor, which can really tempt anyone into cancelling their appointment. But while pain is an unfortunate part of the waxing process, experts like Wagner note that there are ways to help keep your pain to a minimum. Avoiding triggers like alcohol and caffeine a few days before your wax can help reduce pain, making the process a little more bearable.

It is normal for your skin to show redness after waxing, so don’t panic if that happens. Some skin is more sensitive than others and reactions may range from no redness at all to very red skin. The first time you wax an area, or if it has been a while since your last waxing, you will probably experience some redness and sensitivity afterward. This usually subsides within a few hours. If you have very sensitive skin, then the redness may last for up to 24 hours.

Because you are removing hair from the root and exfoliating the skin, after a wax, you’ll probably find that your skin is now among the smoothest things in your life.

If you find your skin inflamed or irritated after your appointment, soothe it with oil. Tea tree oil is a great option: It protects and moisturizes skin, and also works as an antiseptic. That means it will ward off ingrown hairs and prevent bacteria-related bumps.

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